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(Slate) Ed Tech is Making the Achievement Gap Even Bigger

” Some studies of the introduction of technology have found an overall negative effect on academic achievement—and in these cases, poor students’ performance suffers more than that of their richer peers. In an article to be published next month in the journal Economic Inquiry, for example, Duke University economist Jacob Vigdor and co-authors Helen Ladd and Erika Martinez report their analysis of what happened when high-speed Internet service was rolled out across North Carolina: Math and reading test scores of the state’s public school students went down in each region as broadband was introduced, and this negative impact was greatest among economically disadvantaged students. Dousing the hope that spreading technology will engender growing equality, the authors write: “Reliable evidence points to the conclusion that broadening student access to home computers or home Internet service would widen, not narrow, achievement gaps.”ome studies of the introduction of technology have found an overall negative effect on academic achievement—and in these cases, poor students’ performance suffers more than that of their richer peers.

 

In an article to be published next month in the journal Economic Inquiry, for example, Duke University economist Jacob Vigdor and co-authors Helen Ladd and Erika Martinez report their analysis of what happened when high-speed Internet service was rolled out across North Carolina: Math and reading test scores of the state’s public school students went down in each region as broadband was introduced, and this negative impact was greatest among economically disadvantaged students. Dousing the hope that spreading technology will engender growing equality, the authors write: ‘Reliable evidence points to the conclusion that broadening student access to home computers or home Internet service would widen, not narrow, achievement gaps.’

 

Why would improved access to the Internet harm the academic performance of poor students in particular? Vigdor and his colleagues speculate that “this may occur because student computer use is more effectively monitored and channeled toward productive ends in more affluent homes.” This is, in fact, exactly the dynamic Susan Neuman and Donna Celano saw playing out in the libraries they monitored. At the Chestnut Hill library, they found, young visitors to the computer area were almost always accompanied by a parent or grandparent. Adults positioned themselves close to the children and close to the screen, offering a stream of questions and suggestions. Kids were steered away from games and toward educational programs emphasizing letters, numbers, and shapes. When the children became confused or frustrated, the grown-ups guided them to a solution.”

 

From: http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2014/06/neuman_celano_library_study_educational_technology_worsens_achievement_gaps.2.html

Why Angular.js? : An Overview

Benefits:

  • organizes JS code
  • responsive dynamic websites
  • compatible with jQuery
  • easy to test

What is it?

  • A client-side JS Framework for adding interactivity to HTML

What are it’s components?

  • Directive : A marker on an HTML tag that tells Angular to run or reference some JS code
  • Modules: where we write pieces of the Angular app, define dependencies for our app, makes code more maintainable, testable, readable
  • Expressions: allow insertion of dynamic values to HTML

Understanding School Funding

QUESTION: I understand that school funding comes from federal, state and property taxes. But why anyone would think relying so heavily on property taxes is a good idea? How was this system established in the first place? What are reasons for and against it? What has been done to overhaul or at least modify it? 

TO DO: Read the following and summarize / communicate in a more creative way:  

The CSS clearfix class

This CSS clear fix uses :before and :after pseudo-elements of the container to perform the clear:

/* Assuming this HTML structure:

	<div class="clear">
		<div class="floated"></div>
		<div class="floated"></div>
		<div class="floated"></div>
	</div>
*/

.clear:before,
.clear:after {
    content: " ";
    display: table;
}

.clear:after {
    clear: both;
}

This CSS reliably clears floating child elements so that the next set of elements has a clear plane to begin from. 

Adapted from: http://davidwalsh.name/css-clear-fix

CSS z-index

z-index only works on positioned elements (position:absolute, position:relative, or position:fixed)

The z-index property specifies the stack order of an element. An element with greater stack order is always in front of an element with a lower stack order.